Acid Reflux Symptoms: Heartburn, Regurgitation, Dyspepsia, and More

Acid Reflux Symptoms: Heartburn, Regurgitation, Dyspepsia, and More

And according to the 2001 NSF Sleep in America poll, adults in America who experience nighttime heartburn are more likely to report having symptoms of sleep problems/disorders such as insomnia, sleep apnea, daytime sleepiness and restless legs syndrome than those who don’t have nighttime heartburn. When I was 28, I was diagnosed with GERD. I had excruciating stomach pains and went to see a doctor. I am now 43 and had not had any symptoms or issues with heartburn or any other symptom associated with GERD again until 9 months ago. I had trouble with food and it felt like the food was getting stuck in my throat.

Your doctor can help you come up with a treatment plan, which may include changing your diet or adding medications. Let your primary care doctor or gastroenterologist know if you’re unable to eat due to nausea, as this may put you at risk for dehydration. Change your eating patterns.

We don’t know the exact cause of gastroesophageal reflux disease. We do know what makes it worse, either by relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter or directly by irritating the esophagus. One of the causes of esophageal strictures can be scar tissue that builds up in the esophagus.

Gastrin is the hormone that is primarily responsible for the stimulation of acid secretion by the stomach. Therefore, the secretion of acid rebounds after the direct acid-neutralizing effect of the calcium carbonate is exhausted. The rebound is due to the release of gastrin, which results in an overproduction of acid. Theoretically at least, this increased acid is not good for GERD.

Depending on the condition or cause, the brain sends a signal to the diaphragm and the stomach which propels the food up the esophagus and out the mouth. If you have a life-threatening condition such as chest pain, difficulty breathing, stroke, head trauma, severe bleeding, or loss of vision – dial 911 immediately. For most other non-life-threatening conditions, GoHealth Urgent Care is an easy and affordable choice.

If testing reveals substantial reflux of acid while medication is continued, then the treatment is ineffective and will need to be changed. If testing reveals good acid suppression with minimal reflux of acid, the diagnosis of GERD is likely to be wrong and other causes for the symptoms need to be sought. There are problems with using pH testing for diagnosing GERD.

The second option is to go ahead without 24 hour pH testing and to increase the dose of PPI. Another alternative is to add another drug to the PPI that works in a way that is different from the PPI, for example, a pro-motility drug or a foam barrier. If necessary, all three types of drugs can be used. If there is not a satisfactory response to this maximal treatment, 24 hour pH testing should be done.

Antacids neutralize the acid in the stomach so that there is no acid to reflux. The problem with antacids is that their action is brief. They are emptied from the empty stomach quickly, in less than an hour, and the acid then re-accumulates. The best way to take antacids, therefore, is approximately one hour after meals, which is just before the symptoms of reflux begin after a meal. Since the food from meals slows the emptying from the stomach, an antacid taken after a meal stays in the stomach longer and is effective longer.

Antiemetic drugs are another option to relieve nausea. Take antacids.

Although diseases of the throat or larynx usually are the cause of the inflammation, sometimes GERD can be the cause. Accordingly, ENT specialists often try acid-suppressing treatment to confirm the diagnosis of GERD.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms of esophageal cancer in conjunction with your acid reflux, talk to your gastroenterologist. Various treatment options are available. Surgery.

Other symptoms include pain in your chest and/or abdomen, difficulty swallowing, dry cough, hoarseness, nausea, vomiting, bad breath, wheezing, and interrupted sleep. GERD is often caused by something that affects the LES, the lower esophageal sphincter. The LES is a muscle at the bottom of the food pipe (esophagus).

It checks the food pipe (esophagus), the stomach, and the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). Your child will swallow a metallic fluid called barium. Barium coats the organs so that they can be seen on an X-ray. Then X-rays are taken to check for signs of sores or ulcers, or abnormal blockages. GERD symptoms may seem like other health problems.

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