Common Heartburn Triggers: Fatty Foods, Alcohol, Citrus, and More

Common Heartburn Triggers: Fatty Foods, Alcohol, Citrus, and More

Vanilla macaroons are in your future. The good (or bad) news is that about 95 percent of sufferers can trace their symptoms back to a particular food, meaning, with a little detective work, you can figure out what to eat and what to avoid. We’ve gone ahead and done some of the grunt work for you.

If this is the case, it is often possible to find relief by elevating the head while sleeping and avoiding eating eat least 2 hours before going to bed. When a person swallows, food passes down the food pipe to the stomach. A ring of muscle tissue called the lower esophageal sphincter contracts after allowing food into the stomach. This prevents the food from returning into the food pipe. Research also suggests that foods high in fiber, particularly soluble fiber, can help reduce the symptoms of GERD.

Like bananas, melons also are a highly alkaline fruit. They are a good source of magnesium, which is found in many medicines for acid reflux. Furthermore, melons have a pH of 6.1, making them only mildly acidic.

While coffee may help perk you up, it actually may do the opposite to our esophageal functions, relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter and increasing the risk of reflux. Wait, wha? Isn’t peppermint a cooling herb? Peppermint is thought to reduce lower esophageal sphincter tension, which makes it easier for stomach acids to creep up. One study found that eight percent of heartburn patients reported complaints after consuming peppermint, and a large systematic review reported heartburn as one of the major side effects of peppermint consumption.

That’s because alcohol relaxes the ring of muscle that separates your stomach from your oesophagus (this muscle is known as the lower oesophageal sphincter), making it easier for the contents of your stomach to leak and cause acid reflux. Binge drinking alcohol is also thought to increase the production of stomach acid and lead to inflammation of the stomach. Being overweight or obese can lead to indigestion and heartburn because it adds pressure on your stomach. This can lead to acid reflux, where acid from the stomach is forced back up into the oesophagus.

A big greasy burger and supersized serving of fries right before bedtime is a good way to fuel the flame of heartburn. Fatty foods, large portions, and late-night meals are the top three triggers that affect many people with heartburn.

If your indigestion symptoms are caused by an infection with H pylori bacteria, you will need to have treatment to clear the infection from your stomach. This should help relieve your indigestion, because the H pylori bacteria will no longer be increasing the amount of acid in your stomach. If you smoke, the chemicals you inhale in cigarette smoke may contribute to your indigestion.

Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) bacterial infection. For most people, indigestion (dyspepsia) is mild and infrequent, and does not require treatment from a healthcare professional. Some people may get bouts of indigestion from helicobacter infection and, in these cases, getting rid of the bug with antibiotics (eradication) will help. However, many cases of indigestion are not caused by helicobacter, and in these cases eradication will not get rid of symptoms.

Until recently, researchers did not fully understand GERD, and there was a lack of scientific evidence to suggest that changing the diet could improve symptoms. The results indicated that people who consumed more cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a higher percentage of calories from fat were more likely to experience GERD symptoms. An article published in the Gastroenterology Research and Practice Journal found a connection between reflux esophagitis, which is inflammation that is usually due to GERD, and a high intake of specific foods. GERD is a digestive disorder, so diet can often affect the symptoms of the condition.

It may relax the lower esophageal sphincter, increase stomach acid or directly damage the lining of the esophagus. Alcohol can do this in many ways. For example, it can relax the lower esophageal sphincter, which may allow stomach acid to escape into the esophagus and trigger heartburn ( 27 ).

top indigestion causing foods

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