Reflux: How to feed your reflux baby

My baby is showing some of signs above and I don’t know what else to do, because every feed is a struggle and I can see she is uncomfortable, she has mild vomiting and suffers a lot when passing wind, and on top of that she needs help when she wants to pass stool, with massaging and gently stimulating her back passage. Hello my little one has suffered with reflux since birth. My h.v advised me to use the anti reflux formula so I did and it worked wonders. I visited a local chemist and they advised me to get that formula on prescription but the doctors refused and put my baby on gaviscone.

Thicker feeds encourage the milk to stay down in the stomach and make it harder to wash back up the oesophagus. But, thicker feeds can be harder for a baby to suck and swallow, and can affect the nutritional content of the formula. Similarly, reducing the volume of feeds might reduce reflux, but may also impact on the nutrition and growth of a baby. The number of feeds in a day may need to be increased if the volume of each feed is reduced. Alginate substances made for babies (such as gaviscon infant) work by thickening the feed and forming a coating over the lower oesophagus and stomach.

Your doctor may also recommend thickening agents to mix with formula or breastmilk, and might prescribe a medication to reduce stomach acidity. But time may be the best medicine of all, as reflux sometimes clears up after the first several weeks, once your baby’s muscle tone increases, and he starts spending more time sitting up, then standing, and eventually eating solids.

Medication may still be the best option for infants with severe symptoms. It’s common for infants to spit up after a meal.

As the food and drink is mixed with acid from the stomach, it can irritate the lining of the foodpipe, making it sore. This is gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Reflux in babies can be very frustrating, and there is rarely one step alone which helps. In addition, every baby is different, and some of these tips may work better than others.

When food is taken through the mouth, it travels down the food pipe and into the stomach. There is a small band of muscle above the stomach opening (called the lower oesophageal sphincter). This band opens when food is about to enter the stomach and then closes so that food remains in the stomach. However in premature babies this band of muscle is weak and doesn’t close properly, so food can go back into the food pipe and into the mouth. This is known as reflux, when partially digested milk or food enters back into the mouth.

During this time your child can go home and do his or her normal activities. You will need to keep a diary of any symptoms your child feels that may be linked to reflux. These include gagging or coughing. You should also keep a record of the time, type of food, and amount of food your child eats. Your child’s pH readings are checked.

GERD is a complication of GER. In infants, GER is much more common than GERD.

Watch your child’s food intake. Limit fried and fatty foods, peppermint, chocolate, drinks with caffeine such as sodas and tea, citrus fruit and juices, and tomato products.

With your pediatrician’s approval, adding a small amount of infant rice cereal to formula or breast milk may be an option to lessen spitting up. Thickening the food is thought to help stop stomach contents from sloshing up into the esophagus. This option has not been shown to decrease other reflux symptoms. Weight loss or failure to gain weight may occur as a result of excessive vomiting or poor feeding associated with acid reflux or GERD. GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

It’s possible that your baby’s reflux symptoms are actually due to a sensitivity to soy protein, wheat, or another ingredient in the formula or cereal. Be sure to read ingredient labels closely and talk to your pediatrician about whether a particular food sensitivity may be to blame. GERD symptoms include frequent spitting up or vomiting, nausea, coughing, trouble swallowing, breathing problems, poor appetite, and difficulty gaining weight. Untreated GERD can lead to laryngitis and even pneumonia since acid and food particles can irritate the vocal cords and the lungs.

Write down key medical information, including how often you feed your baby, how long the feedings last and the brand of any formula that you are using. Put baby to sleep on his or her back. Most babies should be placed on their backs to sleep, even if they have reflux. Try smaller, more-frequent feedings. Feed your baby slightly less than usual if you’re bottle-feeding, or cut back a little on the amount of nursing time.

The fundoplication operation uses the top of the stomach to strengthen the sphincter so it is less likely to allow food, drink or acid to travel back into the foodpipe. The main sign of gastro-oesophageal reflux is frequent spitting up or regurgitation after feeds. This is often accompanied by abdominal pain or general crankiness in the hours after feeding.

Make sure the crib or sleeping area is free of thick blankets, pillows, loose objects, or plush toys. Studies have shown an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in all sleeping positions except for on the back. This applies to all babies, even those with GER and GERD. Babies who sleep at an incline in a car seat or carrier have been shown to have more reflux as well as an increased risk of SIDS.

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