The Claim: Mother’s Heartburn Means a Hairy Newborn

The Claim: Mother’s Heartburn Means a Hairy Newborn

For others, it becomes a problem later on when their bump is expanding and there seems to be no room for food. But what is clear, is that most women will get indigestion at some point in their pregnancy, and it can be very very uncomfortable and can make you feel nauseous and bloated. Some women experience relief from their nausea and vomiting symptoms from dietary supplements such as ginger and Vitamin B6 (25 mg). The over-the-counter sleeping aid, Doxylamine (Unisom sleep tabs, 12.5 mg in the morning and evening and 25 mg at bedtime), has also been known to help with nausea and vomiting.

The esophagus does not have this protection. Stomach acid is a strong acid produced by the stomach to help digest food. The esophagus is a muscular tube stretching from the throat to the stomach.

Although there are no studies in pregnant women, animal studies have shown no effects on the fetuses of animals. Nizatidine (Axid) should not be used because it has been shown to have adverse effects on animal fetuses, although at much greater doses than those used in humans. If lifestyle changes are not adequate, treatments with medications that are minimally absorbed into the body (and therefore not a potential threat to the fetus) could be started. Treatments include antacids (for example, Maalox, Mylanta), alginic acid/antacid combination (Gaviscon), and sucralfate (Carafate). The most reasonable first line of treatment is antacids alone, one hour after meals and at bedtime.

The main symptom of indigestion is pain or a feeling of discomfort in your chest or stomach. This usually happens soon after eating or drinking, but there can sometimes be a delay between eating a meal and developing indigestion.

Too much fluid mixed with too much food will distend the stomach, aggravating heartburn. Try to drink most of your fluids between meals.

Pepcid Complete also has antacids in it. If you still have symptoms after lifestyle modifications and antacids, your health-care professional probably will prescribe a stronger drug.

Sucralfate acts locally in your stomach and only a small amount absorbs into your blood stream. That means there’s a very low risk of exposure for your developing baby. Heartburn often starts late in your first trimester and may get worse throughout your pregnancy.

All the foods and liquids that are swallowed travel through the esophagus. Prevention of GERD involves modifying lifestyle factors in diet, activity, and habits that trigger symptoms. Heartburn is a burning pain in your chest, just behind your breastbone. The pain is often worse after eating, in the evening, or when lying down or bending over. “There’s also a link between heartburn and GERD and stress levels, so try to take time out to relax if you’re developing these kinds of symptoms,” suggests Dr. Malloy.

Popular in: Acid Reflux / GERD

A very full stomach will only make your heartburn worse. What you can eat during pregnancy is largely dependent on how certain foods make you feel.

  • This is because during pregnancy your body produces hormones that can slow down digestion and can cause the muscular valve between the oesophagus and the stomach to relax.
  • Antacids containing calcium carbonate are the most potent in neutralizing stomach acid.
  • Acid reflux occurs when the acid in your stomach-which should stay in your stomach!

Drinking a glass of milk may relieve heartburn (the burning sensation from stomach acid leaking up into your gullet). You may want to keep a glass of milk beside your bed in case you wake up with heartburn in the night. You are more likely to get indigestion if you are very full, so regularly eating large amounts of food may make your symptoms worse. If you are pregnant, it can be tempting to eat much more than you would normally, but this may not be good for either you or your baby. Your GP or midwife may suggest some of the following simple changes to your diet and lifestyle.

But if you keep getting it after pregnancy, your doc may order additional testing, including an upper endoscopy, a test that’s used to look at the inside of the upper digestive tract. The most common symptoms of acid reflux are a burning sensation in your throat or upper chest. ( Heartburn, anyone?) You might also feel nauseous. Burping and regurgitation can also be signs of acid reflux.

Some people experience a worsening of acid reflux at night. This type of acid reflux is known as nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux or nighttime reflux, and it can negatively impact a person’s sleep. Fatty foods contribute to GERD symptoms by interfering with the LES and slowing digestion in the stomach.

The stomach has a special layer that protects it from stomach acid, but the esophagus is unprotected. When stomach acid gets into the esophagus, it irritates the lining, causing a burning sensation in an area located close to the heart, otherwise known as heartburn.

cures for acid reflux while pregnant

Why you’re getting that nasty reflux during pregnancy – and how to deal. Plus, how to prevent more acid reflux (woo hoo!). National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease During Pregnancy, November 2012. Chew on sugarless gum.

cures for acid reflux while pregnant

Some also contain aluminum, which is not considered safe for pregnancy. Unfortunately, heartburn is a symptom you’re likely to experience throughout your entire pregnancy if you have it at all. In fact, even if you escaped indigestion early on in your pregnancy, there’s a good chance you’ll have a surge starting around the second or third trimesters, when your uterus takes over your abdominal cavity and forces your stomach upwards.

cures for acid reflux while pregnant

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